Skip to main content

Story Time: How I got my battle scars (Part 1)


Story Time: How I got my battle scars

Hi everyone, welcome back to my blog. I know many of you that have seen me in real life or have seen my pictures have questions about my scars. I'd have questions too if I was in your shoes. To note, putting myself out there like this is new to me but I believe my story will bless and inspire someone. It is a story of victory, deliverance, overcoming tragedy and experiencing God’s intentional love. 



Romans 8:28 (TPT) So we are convinced that every detail of our lives is continually woven together to fit into God's perfect plan of bringing good into our lives, for we are his lovers who have been called to fulfil his designed purpose.



On the 24th of March, 2012 my life changed forever. As the secretary of the History and International Studies student association at Babcock University (2012), I was part of the planning process for the annual departmental field trip. I woke up bright and early ready to face a wonderful and impactful day planned for my fellow departmental members. We had organised buses to transport the students to Badagry Slave Port. This was an opportunity for us, History students, to learn more about slave history. It was a wonderful idea and in retrospect, a great experience for all of us.

After a long day of seeing the chains my ancestors were bound to as they were sold into the Atlantic slave trade as well as experiencing the journey to the slave boats, I was exhausted. On our way back to school, I got separated from my friends because I had to give up my seat to other students who had lost their seats. It was the right thing to do as a leader, an act that almost cost me my life. I went and joined a private car owned by the university support staff that had accompanied us on the trip. The ride back was slow because the private car kept having mechanical issues. After stopping a couple of times to either jumpstart the battery or do something else, we decided to ditch the car. Luckily for us, we were able to join one of the other buses that had a little room for us to squeeze into. After a long stressful day, I decided to take a nap as we journeyed back to school. I rested my head on the window and fell asleep. This was the end of a life I once knew.

The Accident

All I can remember is a very loud deafening sound and being unconsious.

The Accident according to witnesses

The driver of the bus I had joined had a good time during the field trip. He was seen gulping bottles of Alomo bitters (For the non-Nigerians, this is an alcoholic herbal drink). In his intoxication, he decided it was a good idea to drive a bus full of students, one lecturer and one University support staff. During the drive back, he was driving like an insane person because he was intoxicated. The other bus drivers in our convoy tried to signal him to slow down but he refused. He kept playing fast and furious by over-taking vehicles in a reckless manner. We were on the expressway which had nothing but thick vegetation to the left and the right. The Lagos/Abeokuta expressway is a single lane road with no median for both sides of traffic. He decided to overtake a vehicle and miscalculated the speed of the oncoming vehicle. Realising that it was too late to avoid collision with the oncoming vehicle, he swerved into the thick forest. The bus somersaulted a couple of times till it landed on its side. It started burning. 

Thankfully, one of the other buses on our convoy watched as this happened and ran to our rescue. To note, Nigeria lacked and still lacks proper infrastructure for emergency services. The students from the other bus started rescuing people out of the bus while others attempted to put out the fire. Everyone was dragged out of the bus except me. I had fallen out and was under the burning bus. They decided to leave the bus to burn out while they rushed the victims to the Hospital. I was on the cold ground literally getting roasted. This happened at about 10 pm. 

But something (I know it is the Holy Spirit) made someone suggest to the group that they should put out the fire. They went back to the site and lo and behold, I was under the burning bus. I was unconscious. Someone said that the bright coloured shirt I wore helped them spot me quickly. I was rescued and rushed to the on-campus Hospital. Babcock University Teaching Hospital was brand new at the time and could not manage that kind of trauma. The doctors swiftly referred me to Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital. My classmate Amarachi held me in her arms as I was transported to the hospital. It was a 20 minutes drive but it seemed like hours. 

What I remember

The conversation between myself and Amarachi goes as thus:

Amarachi: Bibi stay with me, we are almost there
Me: Wait, what are you talking about. I am fine
Amarachi: Please pinch my hands so I know you are conscious
Me: I am fine, stop freaking me out
Amarachi: Bibi please don't go, pinch my hands

I soon realised that Amarachi couldn't hear me and I got confused as to what was going on. I decided to pinch her hands in response to her panicky voice. (In summer 2012, I asked Amarachi about our conversation and she said I was not talking to her. She needed me to talk because she felt like I was slipping away. I asked if she felt my pinch and she responded by saying a barely scratch her. But my tiny scratch was enough for her to know I can hear her even though I couldn't talk.)

When I got to the Hospital, my clothes were torn in the middle with scissors. I remember feeling like I was in a scene from Grey's Anatomy emergency room. I was butt naked and thoroughly cleaned with normal saline solution and was wrapped with a bandage, I felt like an Egyptian mummy. I got emergency stitches on my hand and on my face (A cut across my brows).  I told the doctor that I was on my period so I won't bleed out on the bed and he said "okay". I was then pushed to the corner of the emergency room to wait until my people come to claim me. I'm thankful for the great emergency service I received. It gave me hope that maybe the worse was over since I was alive. LOL, it was only the beginning of a tornado.

This was the end of that day. March 21st, 2012.

Thank you so much for reading to the end, I still have a lot to say about how this accident affected my life, my family and many more. I decided to stop here because I am not a fan of really long posts. Part two of this story will be on next Thursday at 7pm Western African Time. It will include the reactions of my dramatic Nigerian mum, my siblings, the importance of therapy and many more.

The journey has been remarkable. This is to encourage someone out there to not give up! Whatever you are going through right now, don't give up! Life happens to us all and we are more than conquerors in Christ. I don't know what your case is but it may be health related, finance related, issues with your marriage or education. Be rest assured that all things are working together for your good. It may not feel like it at the moment, I have been there before. Hang in there, you will testify to the goodness of God in the land of the living. 

"Yet amid all these things we are more than conquerors and gain a surpassing victory through Him who loves us" - Romans 8:37 

With love,
Bibi

Comments

  1. This is beautiful. I have always wondered how you got that scar because I know you didn't have it in when we were in high school.
    I am glad for the woman you have become. Restoring hope through God's word and your personal encounter with him.
    You are a blessing to our generation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much Taiwo. I appreciate your kind words. This means a lot to me. God bless you.

      Delete
  2. I haven't known you for long but each time i read your post you minister to me, you're an example of how twitter can be used for the gospel. Thank you! and please keep the fire burning.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Deep. ..
    Glad u survived it.
    All glory to God .

    ReplyDelete
  4. 🤣🤣🤣 we thank God for life, we can laugh now that u have gotten over it.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The news sent troubled wave around us, but at the end we give God the glory for preserving your life for His divine purpose, your destiny is just unfolding.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Wow! Bibi! Your life is indeed a testimony that God has his eyes on is at all times. Most importantly, your victory posture despite the trauma and scars has greatly encouraged me. Thanks for this.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I cannot remember how I got the news but it really scared me, I just knew I had to see you then. God be praised, your story has been marvelous so far.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thank you for sharing. Your life is a miracle. You are designed for His Glory. Keep basking in God's unending love.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Finally I'm able to read this, as usual this your post ministered to me in ways I can't explain. God's protection will always be on you. That joy and light you have been radiating will not vanish nor get dim in Jesus name.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Men are Scum: The godly man guide to not being a scum

Men are Scum: The godly man guide to not being a scum
Last week, I watched Larry Charles' dangerous world of comedy on Netflix and the third episode focused on sexism.  It turns out that Nigeria's comedy industry thrives on sexists jokes that objectify women, normalise rape and encourage the exploitation of women. It was one of the most disgusting things I have ever watched. It's interesting that many think rape is a thing to joke about and the audience laughs at those vile jokes that involve victim blaming. Sexism is broadly seen in our society from the blue collar workers to the board room bosses, from Nollywood movies to product commercials. It is so deeply embedded in our subconscious that we don’t intend to hurt women with our words or actions, it is just a thing of a "normal thing". The truth is I am not trying to vilify anyone. The average man was dealt sexism as a part of being in this present day society. The good thing is you can unlearn all of these thin…

Have faith, you will make it

Faith it till you make it
"Fake it till you make" was my go-to word and action while I was doing my post-graduate studies. For those that don't know what this means it is simply the act of imitating confidence, competence, and an optimistic mindset until you achieve your goals even when everything is not going your way. Basically, you may be discouraged on the inside about a situation but you act as though you are positive about it on the outside. For science lovers, this act is actually based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). But since we are Christians, I decided to title it faith it till you make it because I realize that faking it keeps us limited at our own abilities. But when you “faith it”, you will assuredly make it!
Mark 11:23-23 (TLB) In reply Jesus said to the disciples, “If you only have faith in God—this is the absolute truth—you can say to this Mount of Olives, ‘Rise up and fall into the Mediterranean,’ and your command will be obeyed. All that’s requi…